" />
Skip to main content
Home  Contact Us  Member Login  Joseph of Arimathea  EDWARD III  DALRAIDA  Blood Line Jesus  Robert II King of Scotlan  ILFORD  Gherardini Florence  ST VINCENT CARIBBEAN  DANIELS PROPHESY ORDNANCE  MACKENZIE ROSSLYN LINK  AT FORTROSE..  JESUS IMAGE IHS CHRISTOS  ISLE OF SKYE GARAFFAD  NIGG  GOOGLE  Paul's copyright Pyramid  SS PETER BONIFACE  St Regulus at Balblair pa  TITLES ALEXANDER MACKENZI  FEARN  Cup and Column  Wessex  The Book  Dimensions of the Libroru  SCOTLANDSPEOPLE  lights  SCANDINAVIAN DREAMS  RH91418612488160114   

https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:2foJS5e8mqQJ:https://cc12488160114.sharepoint.com/+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk https://cc12488160114.sharepoint.com/_layouts/15/wh/Editor/default.aspx?fileUrl=Pages/ATFORTROSE.aspx&tabName=design



Sergeant Andrew Foster & private Andrew Foster.. ancestor of Paul Kay

Service: Dress Tunic

The badges on his cap and collar definitely show that he is in the Royal Artillery, on the right side of the collar there is insignia  a hare and an insect, this might denote a particular system in the artillery related with the field, single breasted tunic with nine polished brass buttons down the front, the collar was scarlet with rounded fronts and trimmed all round (top and bottom) sergeants wore gold trimmings instead of yellow.  He also has star badges on his right sleeve which indicate that he is in a Volunteer Artillery unit, the star on his lower sleeve denote 5 years efficient service, his rank Sergeant, 3 stripes, 12 years in service to attain this rank, his medal might be long service or campaign medal, the volunteer long service medal (20yrs) They were like the TA of their time. The peaked cap he is wearing was adopted by the army c 1905. He is wearing the dress tunic; blue with red collar, which was discontinued around 1914 so the photo dates between 1905 and 1914, before 1914 Great war, many of ex-volunteers (usually aged 40-55) joined the National Reserve (formed 1912) and when war broke out these National Reservists were called up by spring 1915 and joined “Supernumerary Companies” of their local Infantry Battalion (in Fife the 2/7th Black Watch) and these companies of the 2/7th were stationed on the south coast around Brighton where he died, cause of death Appendicitis with abscess, Peritonitis, operated on 19 October 1915, this is my great-grandfather,the cap badge is Royal Artillery, they look similar in other county artillery regiments and differ according to the patent of the badge, his service number will not be the same as 3509, Lance corporal 2nd/7th Royal Highland as he is a sergeant earlier in another Regiment perhaps the (Black Watch) Kirkcaldy Battery of the Fife Artillery Volunteers (called the Fife RGA (Volunteers) around that time), with the Territorial Reforms of 1908 the old Volunteers were swept away although many of the men joined the new Territorial Force, the Kirkcaldy Battery became part of the Forth Royal Garrison Artillery (TF) the dress of all units of the Artillery were near identical, only the shoulder titles and piping colour varying.  from Paul Kay born 07.08.1957, Kirkcaldy, Fife.

 

Resided:

1870, 64 Nicol Street, Kirkcaldy

1881, 12 Elgin Cottages, Dysart

1891, 12 Elgin Cottages, Dysart

1892, 12 Elgin Cottages, Dysart

1893, 173 High Street Kirkcaldy

1896, 19 Nicol Street, Kirkcaldy

1903, 122 Links Street, Kirkcaldy

Died 23.10.15

War: The Boer War.

 

General Botha at the Battle of Colenso on 15th December 1899 during the Boer War

 

General Botha at the Battle of Colenso on 15th December 1899

 

Date: 15th December 1899

 

Place:      Colenso on the Tugela River in Northern Natal, South Africa.

 

Combatants:  British against the Boers.

 

General Sir Redvers Buller the British commander at the Battle of Colenso on 15th December 1899 during the Boer War

 

General Sir Redvers Buller the British commander at the Battle of Colenso on 15th December 1899

 

Generals: General Sir Redvers Buller against General Botha.

 

Size of the armies:         16,000 British against 12,000 Boers.

 

 Arms and equipment at the Battle

 

The London Gazette of 22nd December which states that from 2nd August 1908 the Fife Royal Garrison Artillery (Militia), is transferred as a unit of the Army Reserve and becomes the Fife Royal Field Artillery

 

The 1st Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment formed part of the 10th Brigade of the 4th Division, along with the 2nd Bn, the Seaforth Highlanders, 1st Bn, the Royal Irish Fusiliers and the 2nd Bn, the Royal Dublin Fusiliers

 

Resided:

1870, 64 Nicol Street, Kirkcaldy

1881, 12 Elgin Cottages, Dysart

1891, 12 Elgin Cottages, Dysart

1892, 12 Elgin Cottages, Dysart

1893, 173 High Street Kirkcaldy

1896, 19 Nicol Street, Kirkcaldy

1903, 122 Links Street, Kirkcaldy

Died 23.10.15

 

 

Kirkcaldy Battery of the Fife Artillery Volunteers (called the Fife RGA (Volunteers) around that time), with the Territorial Reforms of 1908 the old Volunteers were swept away although many of the men joined the new Territorial Force, the Kirkcaldy Battery became part of the Forth RGA (TF) the dress of all units of the Artillery were near identical, only the shoulder titles and piping colour varying.

His military career probably followed this route… joined the local volunteers and served a number of years (the star on his lower sleeve denote 5 years efficient service, his medal looks like the volunteer long service medal (20yrs) but could just as easily be a shooting or another volunteer medal) before giving it up a little before 1914 great war, many of ex-volunteers (usually aged 40-55) joined the National Reserve (formed 1912) and when war broke out these National Reservists were called up by spring 1915 and joined “Supernumerary Companies” of their local Infantry Battalion (in Fife the 2/7th Black Watch) and these companies of the 2/7th were stationed on the south coast around Brighton where he died, cause of death Appendicitis with abscess, Peritonitis, operated on 19 October 1915

 The nearest I can find to an answer to your question is an entry in the London Gazette of 22nd December which appears to say that from 2nd August 1908 the Fife Royal Garrison Artillery (Militia), is transferred as a unit of the Army Reserve and becomes the Fife Royal Field Artillery

http://www.britishbadgeforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20932

The 1st Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment formed part of the 10th Brigade of the 4th Division, along with the 2nd Bn, the Seaforth Highlanders, 1st Bn, the Royal Irish Fusiliers and the 2nd Bn, the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.  As Private R. G. Hill of the Warwicks would recall:

Records of the 
Scottish Volunteer Force 
1859-1908 
BY 
LIEUT.-GENERAL SIR JAMES MONCRIEFF GRIERSON 
K.C.B., C.V.O., C.M.G., 231. 
with a new introduction by 
LAURENCE V. ARCHER 
Frederick Muller Ltd 
Pages 126-7 
ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY VOLUNTEERS. 
NOTES COMMON TO ALL THE CORPS. 

IN the following records of individual corps they have been placed in the order of their precedence in the whole force of Volunteer Garrison Artillery, which numbered sixty-eight corps, in the United Kingdom, namely :— 
9. 1st Edinburgh (City). 
11. 1st Mid-Lothian. 
13. 1st Banff. 
17. lst Forfarshire. 
30. 1st Renfrew and Dumbarton. 
32. 1st Fife. 
35. 1st Lanarkshire. 
38. 1st Ayr and Galloway. 
39. 1st Argyll and Bu.. 
43. 1st Caithness. 
45. 1st Aberdeenshire. 
46. 1st Berwickshire. 
47. The Highland. 
54. 1st Orkney. 
The following changes of designation took place, and are common to all corps, to no mention of them has been made in the corps records:— 
In 1882 all the Scottish artillery volunteer corps were "affiliated " to the " Scottish Division, Royal Artillery," but this involved no change in their titles. 
By Army Order 166 of August 1891 the corps were termed " Volunteer Artillery Corps," and affiliated to the " Southern Division, Royal Artillery," but were not required to add the latter designation to their county titles. This affiliation to divisions was discontinued in 1901. 
By Army Order 27 of February 1902 the corps were desig¬nated, e.g., "1st Edinburgh (City) Royal Garrison Artillery (Volunteers)." 
Royal Garrison Artillery Volunteers. 127 
The "companies" of volunteer artillery first raised were in 1860 designated " batteries," and this title they continued to bear till 1891, when by Army Order 234 of November they were termed " companies," in accordance with the nomen¬clature adopted for the regular garrison artillery. When " position," afterwards called " heavy," batteries were formed in 1889, the personnel of two " garrison batteries " had to be combined to man each. This led to confusion, so in 1892 these position batteries were made independent units, and by Army Order 218 of November 1892 a numbering was ordered by which, in corps composed entirely of position batteries or garrison companies, these were numbered from 1 onwards, and in corps composed partly of position batteries and partly of garrison companies the former were numbered first—e.g., 1st, 2nd, and 3rd,—the garrison companies being numbered in sequence, 4th, 5th, &c. Thus in the corps records the words " battery " and " company " are used before and after 1892 to designate the same unit, " position " or "heavy " battery being specially used to designate units of that nature. The "position" batteries were designated " heavy " by Army Order 120 of May 1902. 
The uniform of the artillery volunteers has from the first been closely modelled on that of the Royal Artillery, therefore it has only been considered necessary to mention in the corps records the original uniforms of 1859-60, which varied consider¬ably according to the fancy of individual corps, but always were dark blue. It was only in 1878 that the scarlet Austrian knot and cap-band were ordered to be worn as the badges to distinguish the volunteer from the militia and regular artillery, and silver lace for officers and white metal buttons for all ranks were from the first worn. As a head-dress, the busby of the Royal Artillery was universally adopted in the "early sixties," and this was replaced in 1880-81 by the helmet, at first worn with a spike and afterwards with a ball. At the "Coming of Age Review in 1881 the 1st Edinburgh (City) and the 1st Renfrew and Dumbarton Artillery were the only corps which still wore the busby. The latter gave it up shortly afterwards, and the former was the only corps in Scotland which, till 1908, wore the head¬dress it assumed on its first formation. 
Page 140 
FIFESHIRE ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY 
(VOLUTEERS) 
(FIFE AND STIRLING.) 
PLATE IV, 
ORDER OF PRECEDENCE, 32 
The Right Honourable. V. A. EARL OF ELGIN AND KINCARDINE, 
Etc. March 26, 1902. 
Headquarters—KIRKCALDY . 
ON 27th November 1860 the 1st Administrative Brigade Fifeshire Artillery Volunteers, with head¬quarters at Kirkcaldy, was formed, and to it were attached, then or on their subsequent dates of forma¬tion, the following corps of Fifeshire Artillery Volun¬teers of one battery each, except the 8th, which at first had two :— 
1st, Ferryport-on-Craig (Tayport), formed January 26, 1860. 
2nd, Newport, formed April 13, 1860. 
3rd, St Andrews, formed March 6, 1860. Uniform—blue long-skirted tunics with red collars and piping, four rows of black lace on the breast, and black Austrian knot, blue trousers with red piping, blue caps with turned-down peak, black band, and red piping, and white waist-belts. The officers had silver lace on their collars and silver shoulder-cords. 
4th, Inverkeithing, formed March 3, 1860. 
5th, Kirkcaldy, formed March 22, 1860. Uniform—blue long-skirted tunics bound with flat black braid, scarlet collars with silver grenade and black Austrian knot, blue trousers with black braid and red piping on both aides, caps like the 3rd Corps, with straight peaks, and brown pouch and waist-belts, the former with a badge of the Royal Arms, the latter with the Thane of Fife on the belt-plate. 
Ith, Burntisland, formed February 20, 1860. 
7th, Elie, formed March 8, 1860; headquarters transferred to Anstruther in 1872, 

Page 141 
8th,Leven, formed July 124, 1860, of two batteries. Uniform- 
tunic as for the 3rd Corps (with silver cord on the collar) 
trousers, cap, and belts as for 5th Corps. Reduced: to one and a half batteries in 1866 and to one battery in 1875.. 
9th, Dysart, formed September 19, 1860. 
10th, East Wemyss, formed January 16,1862, out of the overflow of the 8th. Uniform as for the 8th. 
11th, Kinghorn, formed April 30, 1863. 
The uniforms of the corps not mentioned above were of the same type as that of the 5th ; some had broad red stripes on the trousers, some white and others brown belts, and all wore the peaked cap. 
In 1863 the following corps of Stirlingshire Artillery Volunteers were added to the brigade : 
1st, Grangemouth, formed Mlarch 27, 1860. Uniform—long 
skirted blue tunic with four rows of flat black braid, red 
collars with silver lace and black Austrian knot, blue 
trousers with red stripes, round forage caps with red band 
(piped with silver cord for officers), and brown belts. 
2nd, Stirling, formed May 30, 1860, as one subdivision. In 
creased to one battery April 17, 1861. Uniform as for 
the 1st, but with white belts. 
In 1863 the whole brigade adopted the regulation artillery tunic with scarlet cord, busby, and forage cap with scarlet band, and brown belts, which were discarded later for white. Helmets replaced the busby in 1881. In 1861, headquarters of the brigade were transferred to St Andrews, and in 1880 the brigade was consoli¬dated as the 1st Fifeshire Artillery Volunteers, head¬quarters at St Andrews, with thirteen batteries, the Fife batteries retaining their numbers as above, and the Stirlingshire corps becoming Nos. 12 and 13 Batteries. In 1882 the 7th Battery (Anstruther) was disbanded, and in its place a new 7th formed at St Andrews out of University students. 
In 1889 a position battery of 16-pounder guns was 
Page 142 
issued to the corps and manned by the 3rd (St Andrews) Battery, and an extra personnel specially raised. In 1892 this became the 1st Position Battery, the Tayport (1st) Company became the 2nd, and the 2nd (Kirkcaldy, transferred thither from Newport on March 3, 1888) became the 3rd. Lieutenant J. N. Hotchkis of the 1st Fife R.G.A.V. served with the 18th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry during the South African War. On March 1, 1900, a new 14th Company was formed at Kirkcaldy, and in 1901 the 16-pounders of the position battery were replaced by 4.7 guns. In October 1906 headquarters were moved to Kirkcaldy. 
The distribution of the corps till 1908 was, - 1st Heavy Battery and No. 7 Company, St Andrews ; No. 2 Company, Tayport ; Nos. 3, 5, and 14, Kirkcaldy ; No. 4, Inverkeithing; No. 6, Burntisland ; No. 8, Leven ; No. 9, Dysart ; No. 10, East Wemyss ; No. 11, King-horn ; No. 12, Grangemouth ; and No. 13, Stirling. Gun drill and gun practice were carried out with 4.7-in., 5-in., and 6-in. Mark VII. B.L. guns at Kinghornness, and with 6-in. Mark VII. guns at Carlingnose. The corps had 10 carbine ranges, and held also the Pilmuir Links range, near St Andresen, conjointly with the 6th Volunteer Battalion, Black Watch. 
The lieutenant-colonels commandant have been-William Maitland M`Dougall of Scotscraig, Admiral, retired, Royal Navy, November 27, 1860. 
John N. M'Leod, April 29, 1874. 
R. Tod Boothby, late Major Forfar and Kincardine Artillery Militia, and from 1861 to 1879 Adjutant of the Brigade (hon. col.), June 28, 1882. 
James William Johnston,' M.V.O., V.D. (hon. col.), November 19, 1892. 
Robert C. Highet, September 30, 1907. 
Colonel Johnston in one of three volunteer officers who marched past, at the Royal Reviews of 1860, 1881, and 190.5, always in the name corps.

 

 

                            
  

                   

 

 

 

 

 












 

     

 






.



 

 

 



 

 

 


 




 





 













AT FORTROSE MARRIAGE  30 Shetland Place,
Kirkcaldy,
KY1 3DY
Fife
Scotland
Driving Directions
Click the map to open an interactive map in a new window.